Why are Commercial, Industrial, and Office real estate leases so long?

“Why is this lease so long?”, “Is all of this wording really necessary?”

I get questions like this from either new businesses, or businesses that have come from a building that simply had a very relaxed leasing policy. More often than not, a relaxed leasing policy and short lease documents that lack detail cause problems.

A commercial real estate lease should be very detailed about the relationship between landlord and tenant. Not only should it contain important details about the deal such as lease term, start date, rental rates, size of premises, use, etc, but it also needs to have details about rules on the property, insurance requirements, types of action that can be taken in the event of a default, environmental responsibilities, and so on. The list is actually quite extensive for what can be contained in a commercial real estate lease which is why most documents are dozens of pages in length. My document often ends up between 30-35 pages depending on the tenant, building, landlord, type of lease, zoning, etc. While many tenant’s may think that’s a long document, I feel each point is necessary and would have difficulty shortening it. I would actually have an easier time finding content to add than take away.

Back to the questions, why are leases so long and is it necessary? If a tenant asks that question and I look at the building they’re in, I likely see issues such as poor maintenance, poor parking arrangements, structural issues, driveway pothole and access issues, and tenant conflicts. A properly written lease document that can address those issues and is enforced by the landlord and tenant ensures fewer issues for both parties. A lengthy lease should be considered as necessary by both parties because leases should be designed to protect the interests of both landlord and tenant. Yes, leases by default are naturally pro-landlord, but that’s because it’s their property. That doesn’t mean there isn’t or shouldn’t be protection for tenant’s so that is something you need to look for and ensure is in your lease. The landlord’s I represent take good care of their buildings because the lease requires them to. This allows the tenant’s to use the property as efficiently as possible to run their businesses, as long as they follow the rules with the other tenant’s. This is the ideal situation for everyone.

Every clause in my lease has a reason and my document is updated when new industry trends occur or new issues are discovered in the marketplace. Each clause has a purpose because at one point it was created to correct a problem or properly define something.

So is all that wording necessary? Absolutely. As long as it reflects the needs of your business and protects the interests of both parties, every clause should be seen as necessary and relevant. Make sure you are represented by a knowledgeable commercial real estate broker to ensure you get what you need from your lease.