warehouse

What type of heating is best for an industrial warehouse?

This blog will focus only on the most popular types of heating in my market and in the golden horseshoe of Southern Ontario, natural gas is often available in most industrial real estate buildings. With that in mind, natural gas is preferred over electric heat sources due to the cost factor. Considering warehouses are large open spaces, what is the ideal way to heat them?

The two primary types of natural gas heating I find in a warehouse are either forced air or radiant tube. Forced air heaters usually hang close to the ceiling and kind of look like a large metal box with vents that blow hot air into a warehouse. Radiant tubes also typically hang close to the ceiling and are in fact long tubes that radiate heat onto the surfaces around it. The primary difference between the two is that one heats the air and the other heats surfaces, so in warehouse setting which is best?

While the answer may ultimately be a matter of preference or a requirement depending the materials a business handles, radiant is often the preferred heat source in a warehouse setting for a couple reasons:

1) If a grade level door or loading dock is opened hot air would escape very quickly, but, considering a radiant heat tube heats surfaces instead of air, people and contents will be more comfortable. This is a common concern for industrial businesses because opening bay doors is a regular occurrence to run the business. Depending on construction materials surfaces often absorb and reflect heat as well, further adding to indoor comfort even when cold air is coming in.

2) For reasons stated above it is often more cost efficient. A forced air heater will run more and struggle to maintain temperature every time a door is opened, and in a warehouse you can imagine the large cubic volume of air that needs to be re-heated as it regularly escapes. Radiant heaters don’t have that struggle.

Ultimately you as a tenant will need to determine the best type of heat for your business, but for those that get frustrated with large bills to heat a warehouse it might be worth considering radiant heat instead if you’re running forced air. It may not be the solution for everyone but it’s definitely worth exploring. If you’re willing to sign a long term lease, some landlords may consider changing the heat type for the right tenant, this could ultimately be negotiated into the lease.

Industrial Space for Lease in St. Catharines - 330 Vansickle Road #2

Industrial Space for Lease in St. Catharines - 330 Vansickle Road #2

Industrial space for lease in St. Catharines - 330 Vansickle Road #2. Unit consists of front showrooms, two washrooms, mezzanine, and warehouse with grade level door access and 18 ft. clear height.

The difference between loading docks and grade level doors in industrial real estate.

I've heard tenant's and landlord's use grade level door and loading dock interchangeably as if they are the same thing. They are not.

Most industrial buildings, units, or space for lease contains a grade level door. It would be rare if a building wasn't equipped with one as they are a standard useful feature. A grade level door opens and closes down to the grade and if that sounds confusing just replace the word grade with ground. The door is level with both inside and outside ground so as you can easily move objects through in and out. Most times these doors are large enough for vehicles to drive through which is an important feature for many tenant's.

The loading dock is different in that the door is truck level and acts as a dock to safely move between building and truck trailer. A transport truck can back its trailer into a loading dock and when parked, it should be possible to enter the truck through the warehouse by flat surface. This makes it possible to load and unload goods quickly, especially with the use of a tow motor or fork lift. Unfortunately loading docks are in demand but have low supply, especially for industrial units under 10,000 sq ft. Compared to grade level doors a loading dock is not cheap or easy to install which is why they are more rare. A property needs to be able to handle truck access to back into a dock as well.

In St. Catharines and the Niagara region it is unfortunately difficult to find loading docks in our current supply of industrial buildings. While there are currently and abundance of grade level doors, it would be good if developers and building owners started recognizing the shortage of loading docks to ensure they are a more common feature for warehouse and distribution tenants needing to rent warehouse space with that feature.